traditional farm house table transformed into a mid-century aesthetic

Our client Beverly had a problem, she had a traditional looking blonde ‘farm-house’ style table and wanted it to match her beautiful mid-century deep dark grained, luscious Parker chairs. Beverly cam to us to see if we could change the aesthetic of her table to bring it into line with her mid-century chairs. We love a challenge…. The dining table would require stripping then adding tint colour. The challenge is getting the tinted timber close to the warmth of the timber you are matching, but it can’t be exactly the same as when you add the top clear coat it adds a few shades to the darkness of the final colour. Yes we know = very tricky! It is no exact science and sometimes it takes more than a few passes with different colour tints to get it close.

Working closely with our client Beverly we discussed the colour options as there were many different shades on the mid-century Parker chairs. Beverly expressed that she did not want to match the lighter golden brown of the arms, which had faded over time. But instead match the deeper darker, richer area of timber towards the back of the back-rest.

Anyway I’m jumping ahead a bit, first lets take a look at the table in question.

traditional farm house table transformed into a mid-century aesthetic

First job, stripper-dee-dip… We removed the existing clear coat from the dining table using a low odour, NON Methylene Chloride or N-Methyl Pyrollidone stripper. This takes the table back to an original timber ready for the magic to begin! A good clean and about a week to dry out then we will be ready to start the tint master-class.

traditional farm house table transformed into a mid-century aesthetic

Once all the stripper has been cleaned, any last residue removed and the table fully dried we can then start to apply the tint colour to the table. The tint or stain penetrates into the timber approximately 1 – 2mm, this gives you some piece of mind that if the table get knocked or chipped (heaven forbid!) in the future you should still see dark timber providing the gauge isn’t too deep. The tint is applied over several days with overnight drying between each coat. Various colours can been added on top of each other to obtain the desired colour, or you can mix them before hand. We like to use a combination of both to get the desired tint colour to our tables.

traditional farm house table transformed into a mid-century aesthetic

As you can see from the photo above of the table tinted and the one below of the chair we are trying to match, they look quite different at this stage. This is due to the tint being unsealed, we need to get the right ‘warmth’ to the colour but not match the colour exactly, as depending on what top coat we use it will darken the timber by a few shades also. We use a wood-wax product on our timber which is a creamy/yellow colour so we know it will add warmth plus a touch of golden colour to the timber, therefore we adjust the tint accordingly.

traditional farm house table transformed into a mid-century aesthetic

Once the satin top coat has been added the colour become warmer and much more in-line with the tone of the chairs. You can see from the photo above the deep, rich brown towards the back-rest of the chair now matches the table. Our client Beverly was over the moon with the work.

traditional farm house table transformed into a mid-century aesthetic
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